ADLA Course Catalog

Detailed course descriptions are below the list of course titles. For test preperation courses and remediation courses click HERE.

Advanced Placement**
AP® Biology
AP® Calculus
AP® Chemistry
AP® English Lit & Comp
AP® US History
 
English Language Arts
English 9
English 10
English 11
English 12
Structure of Writing*
 
Math
Pre-Algebra
Algebra I
Geometry
Algebra II
Trigonometry*
Pre-Calculus*
Calculus
Consumer Math
Integrated Math
 
Science
Physical Science
Earth Science
Biology
Chemistry
Physics
Environmental Science
 
Social Studies
Geography
World History
American History
American Government*
Civics*
Economics*
 
World Languages
French I
French II
French III
French IV
German I
German II
German III
German IV
Japanese I
Japanese II
Latin I
Latin II
Mandarin (Chinese) I
Mandarin (Chinese) II
Spanish I
Spanish II
Spanish III
Spanish IV
 
Technology
Computer Fundamentals
Digital Photography*
Digital Video Production*
Flash Animation*
Game Design*
Java Programming*
VB.Net Programming*
Web Design*
 
Electives
Accounting
Art Appreciation*
Career Planning*
Driver's Education*
Health*
Life Skills*
Music Appreciation*
Nutrition & Wellness*
Personal Finance*
Physical Education
Psychology* Sociology
 
Foundations
 
Algebra I
American History
Biology
Earth Science
English I
English II
English III
English IV
Geography
Geometry
Health*
Physical Science
World History
 

* = .5 credit course
(E) = ELL-Assistive Content Included in this Course
** Aventa Learning by K12 has been authorized to use the AP designation, following successful review of its courses by the College Board. AP and Advanced Placement Program are registered trademarks of the College Board.

Advanced Placement**

AP Art History This course is designed to broaden students’ knowledge of architecture, sculpture, painting, and other art forms within various historical and cultural contexts. In AP Art History, students identify and classify artworks from prehistory through the 20th century, formally analyze artworks by placing them in the historical context within which they were created, consider the visual traditions of the cultures that created artworks, and understand interdisciplinary and cultural influences on works of art. In addition to visual analysis, the course considers issues such as patronage, gender, and the functions and effects of artworks. This course uses a textbook. Prior art training is not necessary for enrollment.

AP Biology This comprehensive general biology course covers biochemistry, molecular biology, genetics, mechanisms of evolution, the evolutionary history of biological diversity, plant and animal form and function, and ecology. The textbook used, range and depth of topics covered, concepts presented, topics discussed, and labs completed in this course are designed to be equivalent to a college-level introductory biology course that biology majors or premedical students would take during their first year. In AP Biology, students acquire investigative and laboratory skills needed for the study of biology and are equipped and prepared for the Advanced Placement Biology examination. Chemistry is a prerequisite for enrollment in AP Biology.

AP Calculus AB AP Calculus AB is a college-level course that introduces limits, differentiation, and integration of functions. Students find and evaluate finite and infinite limits graphically, numerically, and analytically. They find derivatives using a variety of methods, including the chain rule and implicit differentiation. They use the first derivative test and the second derivative test to analyze and sketch functions. Each unit of this course includes exam-preparation content for the Advanced Placement Calculus AB examination. Students enrolling in the AP Calculus AB course must have knowledge of algebra, geometry, trigonometry, analytic geometry, and elementary functions. AP Calculus AB uses a textbook, and a graphing calculator is required.

AP Chemistry This two-semester course is equivalent to a full-year introductory college course in general chemistry. Topics presented in AP Chemistry include components of matter, stoichiometry of formulas and equations, chemical reactions, kinetic-molecular theory, thermochemistry, electron configuration, chemical bonding, intermolecular forces, properties of mixtures, periodic patterns, organic compounds, equilibrium, and thermodynamics. Students learn fundamental analytical skills to logically assess and solve chemical problems. They develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions based on informed judgment, using mathematical formulation principles, chemical calculation, and laboratory experiments. Students learn to present evidence in clear and persuasive essays and prepare for the Advanced Placement Chemistry exam. The course uses a textbook, and a chemistry lab kit is required.

AP Computer Science A AP Computer Science A is the equivalent of a first-semester, college-level course in computer science. The course emphasizes object-oriented programming methodology with a concentration on problem solving and algorithm development. It also includes the study of data structures, design, and abstraction. Students enrolling in AP Computer Science A should have knowledge of mathematics at the Algebra II level as well as some previous programming experience, a basic understanding of networks, and knowledge of the responsible use of computer systems (including system reliability, privacy, legal issues, intellectual property, and the social and ethical ramifications of computer use). To take this course, students need regular access to a computer system with recent technology.

AP English Language This course prepares students for the Advanced Placement exam in English Language and Composition. The literary component of the course covers a range of genres, including nonfiction, fiction, drama, and poetry. While analyzing these works, students consider style (a language-based approach to exploring meaning in a piece of writing through tone, diction, and syntax) and rhetoric (the examination of the argument and structure of a piece of writing by considering aspects of the author’s credibility, irony, and use of logic). Writing assignments cover both expository and argumentative aspects of writing. Prior coursework in English through the high school sophomore level is required for enrollment in AP English Language.

AP English Literature AP English Literature prepares students for the Advanced Placement exam in English Literature and Composition. In this course, students acquire the reading and critical thinking skills necessary to understand challenging material, analyze that material to deduce meaning, and apply what they learn. They also acquire the composition skills needed to communicate their understanding effectively to a variety of audiences. Students read and analyze classic works of literature that contain literary qualities that merit study and provoke deep thought. Students also read modern and contemporary works as they examine a variety of literary genres, including plays, short stories, poetry, essays, and novels. Prior coursework in English through the high school junior level is required for enrollment in this course.

AP Environmental Science Students examine the natural world’s interrelationships in AP Environmental Science. During this twosemester course, they identify and analyze environmental problems and their effects and evaluate the effectiveness of proposed solutions. They learn to think like environmental scientists as they make predictions based on observation, write hypotheses, design and complete field studies and experiments, and reach conclusions based on the analysis of resulting data. Students apply the concepts of environmental science to their everyday experiences, current events, and issues in science, politics, and society. The course provides opportunities for guided inquiry and student-centered learning that build critical thinking skills. Prerequisites for enrollment include two years of prior coursework in laboratory sciences (Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, or Physics).

AP European History This course surveys the social, economic, cultural, intellectual, political, and diplomatic history of modern Europe and its place in the history of the world—from the fall of Constantinople to the fall of the Berlin Wall and collapse of the Soviet Union. The course is equivalent to a college freshman or sophomore modern European history course. Students develop an understanding of the major periods, ideas, movements, trends, and themes that characterize European history from approximately 1450 to the present. They also develop the ability to analyze historical evidence and express their understanding and analysis in writing. This course prepares students for the Advanced Placement European History exam.

AP French Language In AP French Language, students apply their knowledge of French grammar and vocabulary and their listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills to a variety of real-world contexts. They learn to speak fluently and accurately, write complex compositions, and comprehend native speakers’ conversation. In addition, they explore French culture in both contemporary and historical contexts to develop an appreciation of cultural products, practices, and perspectives. The equivalent of a college-level language course, this course is taught in French and prepares students for the Advanced Placement exam as well as for further study of French language, culture, and literature. The successful completion of French III is a prerequisite for enrollment in this course.

AP Macroeconomics* Macroeconomics is the study of how economic systems work as a whole. In this one-semester course, students learn how the economy is measured by indicators such as gross domestic product (GDP), among others. They examine concepts such as inflation, unemployment, world trade patterns, and the role of the Federal Reserve Bank. Students engage in decision making to create an environment in which high employment rates and higher living standards can be achieved by using fiscal and monetary policy. Topics presented in the course include measuring economic performance; aggregate demand and aggregate supply; money, monetary policy and economic stability; monetary and fiscal policy; and international economics. This course prepares students for the AP Macroeconomics exam.

AP Microeconomics* Microeconomics is the study of economics on the level of individual areas of activity and how individuals make choices with limited resources. In AP Microeconomics, students examine concepts such as supply and demand, factors of production, roles of labor and management, the relationship between the environment and the economy, and the effect of government on individual decision making. Students study the stock market as an investment option and trace various stocks throughout the semester, using the Wall Street Journal and the Internet as resources. Topics presented include the nature and functions of product markets, theory of the firm, factor markets, and role of government. This course prepares students for the AP Microeconomics exam.

AP Physics B AP Physics B surveys the algebra-based major areas of physics—mechanics, fluids, waves, optics, electricity, magnetism, and modern physics (atomic and nuclear). Students learn to think like scientists: they make predictions based on observation, write hypotheses, design and complete experiments, and reach conclusions based on the analysis of resulting data. They apply the concepts of physics to their everyday experiences, current events, and issues in science and engineering. AP Physics B provides opportunities for guided inquiry and student-centered learning that build critical thinking skills. This course prepares students for the Advanced Placement Physics B exam. Prerequisites include Algebra II and Trigonometry; one year of Physics is highly recommended.

AP Psychology* This one-semester course surveys the major topics in the field of psychology as well as terminology, methodology, and the historical and current understanding of human behavior and thought processes. Concepts, terminology, and research findings are presented at the level of an introductory college psychology course. Students learn how psychologists analyze human experiences and apply what they have learned. Organized in seven units, the course presents the following topics: introduction to psychology, the biological basis of behavior, human development and awareness, human cognition, human motivation and emotion, human interaction, and course review. The course prepares students to take the Advanced Placement Psychology exam. Prior coursework in Biology is suggested. This course uses a textbook.

AP Spanish Language AP Spanish Language students practice their Spanish speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. They study vocabulary and grammar and then apply what they’ve learned in extensive written and spoken exercises. Students develop an expansive vocabulary and a solid knowledge of all verb forms and tenses. Culture is an important aspect of the course; students explore culture in both contemporary and historical contexts to develop an appreciation of cultural products, practices, and perspectives. The equivalent of a college-level language course, AP Spanish Language prepares students for the Advanced Placement exam as well as for further study of Spanish language, culture, and literature. The successful completion of Spanish III is required for enrollment in this course.

AP Statistics Statistics concerns the collection, organization, and interpretation of data. In AP Statistics, students interpret the output generated by statistical software programs. This two-semester course presents the following topics, among others: organizing data, examining relationships, producing data, probability, random variables, binomial and geometric distributions, sampling distributions, and inference. This course prepares students to take the Advanced Placement Statistics exam. Students who enroll in AP Statistics must have access to a computer equipped with software capable of doing data analysis. In addition, one of the following Texas Instruments calculators is required: TI-83, TI-83+, TI-84, TI-84+, or TI-89. Prerequisites for AP Statistics include Algebra I and Algebra II.

AP U.S. Government* This course presents an analytic perspective on American politics, covering the ideals, institutions, and processes that direct the daily operations of government and shape public policy. In AP U.S. Government, students examine the constitutional structure of government, participatory politics, the formal institutions of power, and the extra-constitutional influences on government institutions. They interpret and analyze the political landscape to develop an understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the U.S. system of government. This one-semester course addresses the following topics, among others: American political culture, the Constitution, federalism, civil liberties, civil rights, public opinion, media, political parties, campaigns and elections, interest groups, Congress, the presidency, the federal bureaucracy, and the federal courts.

AP U.S. History AP U.S. History focuses on the development of analytical skills to enable students to critically interpret the nation’s history. In this course, students assess historical primary and secondary sources, weighing the evidence presented, to arrive at informed conclusions. They learn to think like historians as they evaluate sources and interpretations, develop thesis statements, support interpretations with evidence, and communicate their conclusions. In the process, they gain an appreciation for how historic events have shaped modern political, social, cultural, and economic life. The course provides opportunities for guided inquiry and student-centered learning that build critical thinking skills. Prior coursework in Social Studies or History is a prerequisite for enrollment in this course.

AP World History AP World History covers the history of the world from 600 CE to the present and includes an introduction unit on the period from 8,000 BCE to 600 CE. The course emphasizes patterns of change and the connections between the various world cultures throughout the time period studied in the course. Students gain an understanding of the global experiences of humanity and can apply that knowledge to their growth and development as world citizens. This two-semester course prepares students to take the AP World History exam. It also provides them with an understanding of why the world developed the way it did. This course uses a textbook.

Language Arts

Grammar and Composition This refresher course helps students bone up on grammar and usage basics and enhance their communication skills through writing exercises and discussions with their peers. Students start by completing a diagnostic writing assignment to identify strengths and areas for improvement. They receive step-by-step instruction on the writing process, follow activities to develop their grammar skills, and have multiple opportunities to practice formal and informal writing. Students use literature and expository pieces as models for their own writing. They participate in threaded online conversations with the teacher and their fellow students to discuss their writing, receive construction feedback for revision, and comment on other students’ work. Throughout the course, rubrics help students remember what is expected of them and help them produce their best work.

English I In this introductory English course, students study a variety of literary genres and continue to develop their composition and grammar skills. The course begins with a diagnostic writing assignment to help students indentify their strengths and discover what they need to work on. Course content includes language conventions, grammar and punctuation particulars, and research techniques; students have multiple opportunities to practice these skills. They explore several literary genres, including a novel they choose themselves, and review the characteristics of each type of literature. Writing assignments consist of journal entries, poetry, formal papers, and an autobiography. Students participate in threaded online discussions with their peers, which encourage higher level thinking and expose students to multiple perspectives.

English II Students survey world literature and work on their composition skills by producing more complex written assignments in this intermediate English course. The course builds on concepts covered in English I as students continue to learn about literary terms and genres. Reading selections reflect a range of time periods, cultures and social circumstances throughout the world. Students synthesize and respond to these works by participating in threaded online discussions with their peers and completing writing assignments. They learn about types of sources, the validity of these sources, and how to format sources according to APA style. Students then use their composition skills to write a persuasive essay, a short story, a short play, and a research paper.

English III In this course, students use an online literary anthology to study American literature and explore the pursuit of the American dream. Examining classic American themes and ideals helps students deepen their awareness of the political and social influences that have shaped American culture. Students hone their reading, writing, speaking, listening, and critical-thinking skills as they read and discuss a wide variety of literary works. Genres covered in the course include nonfiction, short stories, novels, plays, journals, biographies, poetry, and speeches from diverse sources. Students apply analytic skills to interpret these works by participating in online discussions with their peers and completing writing assignments. They receive additional instruction on the research process, including how to organize information, how to format citations and references according to MLA style, and how to avoid plagiarism.

English IV This course helps students develop the reading comprehension, writing, and analytic skills they need to be successful in college. Students begin by taking a diagnostic writing assessment to identify their strengths and detect areas to work on. They read from a wide variety of sources and acquire effective reading comprehension and note-taking strategies. Course content includes grammar and usage particulars, such as parts of speech, sentence structure, and how the elements of language influence an author’s intent. Throughout the course, students use writing as a tool for reflection, learning, problem solving, and personal growth. They do various types of writing, including literary analysis, and use the writing process to refine their skills. Rubrics and threaded discussions help students remain proactive as they prepare for post secondary level coursework.

Creative Writing Students create original essays, poems, and short stories in this course, which uses two textbooks and focuses on the four-step process writing model. They read professionally written forms of creative writing as models and then integrate their impressions of these works with their personal life experiences as they compose their own writing projects. Students are encouraged to write about topics they find engaging as they practice writing on the following themes: narration, definition, process analysis, cause and effect, and comparison/contrast. After students turn in each assignment, the teacher supplies detailed suggestions for revision. This feedback helps students learn how to improve their selfexpression and self-editing skills.

Journalism* In this course, students produce news stories, editorials, features, and sports articles as they learn the basics of journalism. The course uses a textbook and covers laws and ethics, freedom of the press, and the principles of journalistic writing. Students learn how to generate ideas and conduct interviews. They improve their writing skills by concentrating on properly organizing their ideas and using correct grammar and vocabulary as they compose their articles and assignments. In the process, they learn how to think critically about the main ideas, points of view and bias, validity of sources, and the relevance of the various topics they write about.

Math

Pre-Algebra This course builds on essential arithmetic skills to provide a foundation for the algebraic concepts students need to succeed in Algebra I and higher-level math courses. Pre-Algebra course content includes real numbers and linear equations, linear inequalities, factoring, fractions, graphing, and elements of geometry. Students study these topics in a self-paced environment that includes a series of randomly generated math problems to help them practice and apply the content they are learning. Students receive immediate feedback on their answers to these math problems. Lessons are supplemented with practice activities, homework, and quizzes; problems in these supplemental elements are formatted like each other to help reinforce the content and help students develop their problem-solving skills.

Algebra I Like Pre-Algebra, Algebra I is structured as a self-paced course that focuses on the presentation of content followed by practice problems. Students begin the course by doing several prerequisite activities to test their algebra readiness. They then progress through topics such as numbers and expressions, functions and linear equations, polynomials and factoring, quadratic functions and radicals, and rational expressions. Students also explore basic statistics and learn about different types of graphs. Narrated slideshows help them grasp and absorb the more challenging concepts introduced in this course. Games and exercises give students opportunities to practice what they’ve learned before turning in graded homework assignments and taking quizzes.

Geometry Geometry builds on students’ prior knowledge by helping them make a connection to the concepts they learned in Algebra I. In this course, they are introduced to the basic elements of geometry and then move on to proofs, parallel and perpendicular lines, the coordinate plane, triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, circles, congruence and similarity, surface area, volume, and transformations. Content is accompanied by numerous graphics and illustrations in this very visual course. Narrated slideshows make it easier for students to understand the more challenging concepts presented. Lessons are supplemented with interactive problems that let students practice what they’ve learned before they do homework assignments and take assessments.

Algebra II Content covered in Algebra II includes functions, radical functions, rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry, geometry, conic sections, systems of equations, probability, and statistics. As students study the progressively more challenging topics in this course, they need more practice and feedback. To meet this need, Algebra II introduces the use of a Math Tutorial Lab, which gives students an open forum to discuss concepts with other students and to get teacher input. The course includes custom animations and flash tutorials to help explain the content. Students learn how to apply the concepts and skills taught in this course to real-world scenarios.

Pre-Algebra This course builds on essential arithmetic skills to provide a foundation for the algebraic concepts students need to succeed in Algebra I and higher-level math courses. Pre-Algebra course content includes real numbers and linear equations, linear inequalities, factoring, fractions, graphing, and elements of geometry. Students study these topics in a self-paced environment that includes a series of randomly generated math problems to help them practice and apply the content they are learning. Students receive immediate feedback on their answers to these math problems. Lessons are supplemented with practice activities, homework, and quizzes; problems in these supplemental elements are formatted like each other to help reinforce the content and help students develop their problem-solving skills.

Algebra I Like Pre-Algebra, Algebra I is structured as a self-paced course that focuses on the presentation of content followed by practice problems. Students begin the course by doing several prerequisite activities to test their algebra readiness. They then progress through topics such as numbers and expressions, functions and linear equations, polynomials and factoring, quadratic functions and radicals, and rational expressions. Students also explore basic statistics and learn about different types of graphs. Narrated slideshows help them grasp and absorb the more challenging concepts introduced in this course. Games and exercises give students opportunities to practice what they’ve learned before turning in graded homework assignments and taking quizzes.

Geometry Geometry builds on students’ prior knowledge by helping them make a connection to the concepts they learned in Algebra I. In this course, they are introduced to the basic elements of geometry and then move on to proofs, parallel and perpendicular lines, the coordinate plane, triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, circles, congruence and similarity, surface area, volume, and transformations. Content is accompanied by numerous graphics and illustrations in this very visual course. Narrated slideshows make it easier for students to understand the more challenging concepts presented. Lessons are supplemented with interactive problems that let students practice what they’ve learned before they do homework assignments and take assessments.

Algebra II Content covered in Algebra II includes functions, radical functions, rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry, geometry, conic sections, systems of equations, probability, and statistics. As students study the progressively more challenging topics in this course, they need more practice and feedback. To meet this need, Algebra II introduces the use of a Math Tutorial Lab, which gives students an open forum to discuss concepts with other students and to get teacher input. The course includes custom animations and flash tutorials to help explain the content. Students learn how to apply the concepts and skills taught in this course to real-world scenarios.

Science

Physical Science Physical Science is an introductory high school science course that prepares students to take Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. This course introduces students to scientific processes, the scientific method, and scientific inquiry. Content includes safety in the lab and the field, principles for conducting experiments, and the need for scientific communication. The course also covers the atomic nature of matter, classification of the elements, the periodic table, acids, and bases. Next, students explore energy, learn about Newton’s laws of motion, and have the opportunity to design their own machine using the basic principles of physics. They finish the course with a survey of the universe, the life cycles of stars, and space exploration.

Earth Science In this course, students learn about the history of life on earth and the development of the geologic time scale. The course includes instruction on how to carry out scientific investigations both in the lab and in the field. Students explore the earth’s terrestrial, atmospheric, and marine ecosystems and discover how human activities affect them. They analyze maps to describe geologic features and meteorological data. Content covers the properties of rocks and minerals, the theory of plate tectonics, the processes of weathering and erosion, and climate patterns. The course concludes with a unit on the structure and composition of the solar system.

Biology Students receive an introduction to general biology in this course, with an emphasis on the processes of scientific inquiry and logical thinking. Instruction covers the fundamental principles of living organisms, including the physical and chemical properties of life, and cellular organization and function. Over the span of two semesters, students gain an understanding of the transfer of energy through metabolic systems, cellular reproduction, the classification of living things, and the six kingdoms of life. This course presents information in an understandable and straightforward way that captures students’ interest while introducing them to up-to-date scientific concepts and procedures.

Chemistry This course enhances inquiry-based learning activities while adhering closely to standards for teaching chemistry. Instruction emphasizes the mathematical, theoretical, and experimental basis of modern chemistry. Students learn fundamentals such as the periodic table, ionic compounds, chemical reactions, different states of matter, thermodynamics, and nuclear chemistry. Throughout this course, students actively engage in exploration and analysis that will improve their ability to explain and predict phenomena using scientific skills. An optional hands-on lab kit is available for purchase with this course. Chemistry is a course for grades 11 or 12 requiring the successful completion of lower-level science courses and math skills from Algebra I or above.

Physics In this course, students learn the fundamentals of physics and gain an understanding of how this branch of science is interconnected with the everyday world. Students explore the concepts of motion, force, gravitation, thermodynamics, the behavior of light and sound waves, and the relationship between electricity and magnetism. They are encouraged to use critical thinking and scientific problem solving to make informed decisions and reach logical conclusions. Approximately forty percent of the course involves virtual laboratory investigations. Some activities require ordinary household items, such as rulers, meter sticks, balls or marbles, string, paper, and pencils. Students must have successfully completed Algebra II to enroll in Physics. Geometry is also recommended.

Environmental Science Environmental Science is a multidisciplinary field that draws from the physical sciences in addition to other fields. This course teaches the connection between all living organisms within an ecosystem. It helps students better understand the impact humans have on the world around them and ways in which individuals can influence the environment through their actions. Environmental Science explains the concept of biome as a region defined by a specific climate, plant life, and animal community. Content highlights the critical value of clean water, the impact of pollution, agricultural and population issues, and various types of existing and future energy resources and technologies.

Social Studies

Geography This course explores world geography on a region-by-region basis and covers a broad range of geographical perspectives. Each unit covers one continent or other major geographical region of the world. Units include North America, Central America, South America, Western Europe, Eastern Europe and Russia, East Asia, Southeast Asia and the Pacific Cultures, Africa, India, and the Middle East. Students first learn about each region’s landforms, climate, and population. They then examine that region’s cultural, economic, and political institutions. Each unit is presented in a parallel format to facilitate interregional comparisons and allow students more clearly to see the similarities and differences between the regions.

World History This World History course examines human development from the dawn of civilization to the present day. Students learn about the socioeconomic conditions, political institutions, and ideological attitudes that have marked various time periods throughout history. Using primary and secondary sources, students conduct inquiry-based research to examine historical events, cultural developments, and social and family structures. They also participate in interactive discussions and analyze statistics and data from maps, charts, and graphs. Students are encouraged to use their critical thinking and problem-solving skills to evaluate the achievements of civilizations in the fields of science, technology, and the arts. American History The instructional content of this course spans the length and breadth of American history from the origins of the nation’s democratic principles through the contemporary domestic and foreign issues affecting America’s security and prosperity. Students analyze key documents and events that that have shaped the nation’s development. They also identify and examine political leaders and other individuals who have played a major role in U.S. history. This course is organized into ten units, which cover settling America, forming the republic, the Civil War, a growing nation, America as a world power, the Twenties, World War II and beyond, the Sixties, the road to the modern era, and charting a new course.

American Government* This course covers the historical background, guiding principles, and political institutions that together constitute the government of the United States. Students examine the structure, function, and power of government at the local, state, and national levels. They gain an understanding of the principles of popular sovereignty, separation of powers, checks and balances, republicanism, federalism, individual rights, and the roles of individuals and groups in the American political system. Instructional material for this one-semester course is presented in seven units, including introduction to government and politics, roots of the American constitution, principles of American government, the federal system, civil rights and liberties, participation in a democracy, and institutions of government.

Civics* Civics is the study of citizenship and government. This one-semester course provides students with a basic understanding of civic life, politics, and government, and a short history of government’s foundation and development in this country. Students learn how power and responsibility are shared and limited by government, the impact American politics has on world affairs, the place of law in the American constitutional system, and which rights the American government guarantees its citizens. Students also examine how the world is organized politically and how civic participation in the American political system compares to that in other societies around the world today.

Economics* This one-semester course provides students with an introduction to basic economic principles, such as how governments use limited resources to best satisfy people’s wants and needs. Key topics include the law of supply and demand; allocation of goods and services; monetary and fiscal policy, saving, borrowing, and spending; the Federal Reserve System and the money supply; unemployment; and inflation. Students learn about the important roles that competition, scarcity, incentives, profit, interest rates, trade, and government regulation play in an open free market economy, and how fundamental decisions about the four factors of production (land, labor, capital, and entrepreneurship) are made.

Contemporary World Issues Students analyze governments, economies, peoples, and cultures from around the world in this course. Instruction emphasizes the structures and policies of the United States and how they compare to other systems in the international community. Students apply critical thinking and research skills to examine current events and contemporary issues, including human rights, the strengths and weaknesses of globalization, America’s role in the international economy, the severe environmental threats facing many regions around the world today, how religion is often used to facilitate and justify violence, and America’s “War on Terror” and its impact on the Middle East and Islamic culture.

World Language

French I Students receive a thorough grounding in the basics of the French language in this introductory, twosemester course. French I has been designed to meet the standards of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). These standards call for a method of teaching that focuses on successful communication through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Course strategies include warm-up activities, vocabulary study, reading, threaded discussions, multimedia presentations, selfchecks, practice activities and games, oral and written assignments, projects, quizzes, and exams. Learning activities in each unit are focused on a specific theme.

French II French II continues the learning process that began with French I and adheres to the standards of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). Instructional material introduces students to new grammar and vocabulary and allows them to build conversational and reading skills to cover many common situations in daily life. Unit topics include daily routine, animals, entertainment, body parts, rooms and furniture, shopping and clothing, meals, sports and recreation, and transportation. Unit activities blend different forms of communication and culture to ensure that standards are met. The successful completion of French I is a prerequisite for this course.

French III This course builds on knowledge that students acquired in the beginning-level courses, French I and II, and aligns with national ACTFL standards. Students learn to express themselves using present, past, future, and conditional tense verbs in increasingly complex grammatical constructions. They become familiar with idiomatic expressions common to daily French speaking and build vocabulary in order to be able to converse on a wider variety of themes in French. Instruction includes more material on French culture, geography, and history than in earlier courses, giving students the opportunity to learn about France and other francophone countries around the world.

French IV Students complete their high school French language education with this two-semester course that, like all of its predecessors, conforms to the national standards of the ACTFL. The instructional material in French IV enables students to use the conditional and subjunctive tenses, and talk about the past with increasing ease, distinguishing which tense to use and when. It also helps students hone their listening skills to enhance their understanding of native speech patterns on familiar topics. Students expand their knowledge of French-speaking countries’ culture, history, and geography and learn about francophone contributions in the arts. Students must pass French III as a prerequisite.

German I German I provides an introduction to the basics of the German language and the German-speaking world. This two-semester course has been constructed to meet the standards of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). These standards dictate a pedagogical method that focuses on successful communication through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Unit topics consist of the alphabet and numbers; greetings; introductions; the calendar (days, months, and seasons); weather; time; colors; familiar objects and places; family; food; pastimes; and school objects and routine. Course strategies include warm-up activities, vocabulary study, reading, threaded discussions, multimedia presentations, self-checks, practice activities and games, oral and written assignments, projects, quizzes, and exams.

German II Instructional content in German II introduces students to new grammar and vocabulary and allows them to build conversational and reading skills to cover many common situations in daily life. Like German I, this follow-up course adheres to the standards of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). Learning activities in each unit are focused on a specific theme. The units for both semesters cover a broad range of useful everyday subjects, including daily routine, animals, entertainment, body parts, rooms and furniture, shopping and clothing, meals, sports and recreation, and transportation. Students must successfully complete German I in order to enroll in this course.

German III This course expands the scope of concepts and information that students mastered in the German I and II courses and aligns with national ACTFL standards. Students learn increasingly complex grammatical constructions, such as present, imperfect, perfect, and future tenses; reflexive and modal verbs; prepositions; conjunctions; relative pronouns; and adjective endings. Unit themes in this two-semester course include vacations, travel, leisure time, healthy living, body parts and ailments, family members, rights and responsibilities, household chores, university study, military service, personal relationships, the importance of appearance, emotions, fairy tales, and animals. Unit activities blend different forms of communication and culture.

German IV German IV builds on the foundation of the first three courses. Students continue to sharpen their speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills while also learning to express themselves on topics relevant to German culture. Authentic texts, current culture, and literature from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland all form part of the instructional material for this course. Each unit focuses on a particular region or city and includes such themes as culture, tourism, and current events. These units cover topics such as contemporary and classical music, expressing opinion, German history, transportation, family weekend travel, shopping, free-time activities, technology, multiculturalism, education, and careers.

Japanese I Students become familiar with the fundamental concepts and constructions of the Japanese language as well as the rich and ancient world of Japanese culture in this two-semester course. Japanese I has been designed to meet the standards of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). Unit topics consist of the alphabet and numbers; greetings; introductions; the calendar (days, months, and seasons); weather; time; colors; familiar objects and places; family; food; pastimes; and school objects and routine. Course strategies include warm-up activities, vocabulary study, reading, threaded discussions, multimedia presentations, self-checks, practice activities and games, oral and written assignments, projects, quizzes, and exams.

Japanese II In Japanese II, course content blends different forms of communication and culture via unit activities to ensure that students meet all standards of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). These standards call for a focus on successful oral and written communication as well as a through grounding in Japanese culture. Unit themes for both semesters cover a broad range of useful everyday subjects, including daily routine, animals, entertainment, body parts, rooms and furniture, shopping and clothing, meals, sports and recreation, and transportation. Students must successfully complete Japanese I in order to enroll in this course.

Latin I This two-semester course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of Latin grammar. Students develop the skills necessary to translate basic sentences from Latin into English and from English into Latin, and to read simple connected passages of Latin prose and poetry. In the process, students learn how verb conjugations and noun declensions work in a highly inflected language and how to analyze the structure of Latin sentences. The course includes a cross-cultural component, introducing students to the world of ancient Rome by allowing them to acquire knowledge—through word study—of Roman institutions, practices, religious beliefs, and ideological ways of thought.

Latin II Latin II builds on the foundation in Latin grammar provided by the Latin I course and also includes an in-depth study of Roman mythology and history. Students expand their use of declensions, adjectives, adverbs, and cases. These skills enable them to translate longer Latin texts into English that require a more complex knowledge of grammar rather than just vocabulary. To practice oral Latin skills, students engage in conversations, seek and give items of information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions. Latin II also takes students on a tour of the ancient classical world, including literature, historical workers, and the lives of famous and influential Romans.

Mandarin (Chinese) I Mandarin (Chinese) I introduces students to the study of the Chinese language. Students learn listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through activities that are based on pedagogically proven methods of world language instruction. Instructional material introduces simple grammatical concepts in innovative ways and provides practice activities with a variety of learning styles in mind. This two-semester course sprinkles culture throughout the units to help students focus on the Chinese-speaking world, its culture, people, geographical locations, and history. Unit themes include greetings, numbers, family members, school life, clothing, daily routine, shopping, and restaurant menus. The course is aligned with national ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) standards.

Mandarin (Chinese) II This two-semester course is a continuation of the introductory-level Mandarin (Chinese) I course. It presents students with new, more complicated areas of Chinese language learning. Units cover a variety of material that is useful to students learning everyday conversational arts. Themes include daily routine, animals, hobbies, the body, descriptions, home life, shopping, entertainment, sports, and travel. Throughout the course, students learn to express themselves using an ever increasing vocabulary of present tense verbs, articles, and adjectives. They gain the skills and confidence necessary to talk about daily activities, leisure-time pursuits and hobbies, body parts and their function, and people and culture.

Spanish I Spanish I gives students an introduction to the basics of the Spanish language and the Spanish-speaking world. This two-semester course aligns with the national standards of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL), which dictate a pedagogical method that focuses on successful communication through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Course unit topics include the alphabet and numbers; greetings; introductions; the calendar (days, months, and seasons); weather; time; colors; familiar objects and places; family; food; pastimes; and school objects and routine. Course strategies include warm-up activities, vocabulary study, reading, threaded discussions, multimedia presentations, self-checks, practice activities and games, oral and written assignments, projects, quizzes, and exams.

Spanish II Students receive additional grounding in grammar and vocabulary in this two-semester course. Instructional material encourages students to build conversational and reading skills to cover many common situations in daily life. Like Spanish I, this follow-up course adheres to the standards of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). Learning activities in each unit are focused on a specific theme. The units for both semesters cover a broad range of useful everyday subjects, including daily routine, animals, entertainment, body parts, rooms and furniture, shopping and clothing, meals, sports and recreation, and transportation. Students must successfully complete Spanish I in order to enroll in this course.

Spanish III This course builds on the grammatical concepts and vocabulary that students mastered while completing the Spanish I and II courses. Spanish III fully aligns with national ACTFL standards. Students learn increasingly complex grammatical constructions, such as present, imperfect, perfect, and future tenses; reflexive and modal verbs; prepositions; conjunctions; relative pronouns; and adjective endings. Unit themes in this two-semester course include chores, directions, feelings, future plans and travel, geography, countries and nationalities, health, household items, measurements, occupations, and personal history. Unit activities blend different forms of communication and culture.

Spanish IV Fourth-year Spanish expands on the foundation of Spanish grammar and vocabulary that students acquired in the first three courses. As with all the earlier offerings, this culminating-level Spanish language course conforms to the standards of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). Students continue to sharpen their speaking, listening, reading and writing skills while also learning to express themselves on topics relevant to Spanish culture. The two-semester course is divided into ten units whose themes include people, achievements, wishes and desires, activities, celebrations, possibilities, the past, the arts, current events, and wrap up and review.

Technology

Computer Fundamentals In this two-semester introductory course, students learn how to use Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint to create, analyze, edit, share, and publish information for a variety of audiences and purposes. Through step-by-step tutorials and a project-based approach to learning, students become familiar with the key concepts and basic skills of today’s information technology sector. The course is organized in units that cover the following topics: Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Internet basics, and e-mail basics. A copy of Microsoft Office 2000, 2002, or 2003 is required for participation in this course.

Digital Photography* In this one-semester course, students will learn the basics of photographic composition and lighting, develop an understanding of using a digital camera and the basics of preparing a digital darkroom. Students will also learn basic color theory and the fundamentals of image processing. Software skills are taught through practical, hands-on activities that get students involved in the learning process and help them retain the content. By the conclusion of this course, students are capable of producing their own unique and highly personalized images. This course is designed for the student who has no background in photography.

Flash Animation* Instructional materials in this one-semester course teach students how to use Flash software to create engaging animations and interactive movies similar to those used on many websites. The course follows a step-by-step approach, beginning with classic animation techniques and ending with students creating their own movies complete with original artwork. Students also learn how to build interactivity into their movies and publish them to the Web. Some sample projects for students in this course include changing an object’s appearance by scaling it as it moves and creating an exploding volcano animation that runs at the press of a button. Flash CS4 is required for this course.

Game Design* Game Design introduces students to the basic skills necessary for game design. Instructional materials highlight the various games in the industry and analyze their approach in terms of design and development. Students explore both the artistic and technical processes of developing game elements such as story, levels, sound, and user interfaces. They merge all these elements into a functional prototype to demonstrate their understanding of the game design process. Unit topics in this one-semester course include history, player elements, genres, elements of game play, setting goals, platform, game generations, and player modes. The following software is required for this course: Blender (freeware), TrackMania Nations (freeware), and Multimedia Fusion Developer (demo).

Java Programming* This introductory-level, one-semester course is designed for people who have very little programming experience. In Java Programming, students gain an understanding of Java platforms and learn how to build a stand-alone application, such as a countdown clock or leap year indicator. Students also learn the techniques of Java and how Java can be used in cross-platform programming. At the end of the course, students are able to write basic programs using Java and are prepared to pursue further instruction in any programming language. Prior coursework in computer fundamentals and programming are prerequisites for Java Programming. JDK 1.5 or a higher version Java application is required for this course.

VB.Net Programming* Students learn basic programming and the essential concepts of VisualBasic.net (VB.NET) in this onesemester course. As an introduction to VB.NET, students are taught the basic uses of the programming language, its similarities to the English language and others, its architecture, program flow, and its flexibility as a programming language. The course helps participants understand the processes involved in software development and object-oriented programming. This is an introductory course that could lead to careers such as software engineer, developer, or game designer. Prior coursework in computer fundamentals is a prerequisite. Visual Studio 2008 Express Edition is required software for this course.

Web Design* This one-semester course introduces students to the mechanics and elements of web design and HTML, the concepts of planning and organizing websites, and the documentation and copyright issues associated with website design. Students engage in a variety of project-based assessments to evaluate their understanding and progress. After completing the course, students are able to understand the planning and organization of a website, the elements of design and HTML, and the copyright and fair use doctrines that apply to website creation. Students also learn how to use a WYSIWIG editor and other online tools to create a website. The NVu software package is required for this course.

Electives

Accounting Through this course, students gain a foundation in the skills needed for college accounting courses, office work, and managing their own small businesses. This introduction to accounting gives students who have never had prior accounting training an overview of the three forms of accounting: financial, cost, and management accounting. The course helps build an appreciation for the role of accounting in managing a profitable business. Instructional material covers the basic concepts, conventions, and rules of the double entry system and includes techniques for analyzing ratios from a balance sheet. The concept of ethics, integrity, confidentiality, and rigor are woven through all the units.

Art Appreciation* This one-semester course introduces students to various forms of the visual arts, such as painting, sculpture, and film. Students learn how to critically examine a work of art in historical, social, and cultural contexts; identify and compare key characteristics in artworks; and understand the role art has played throughout history. Through hands-on activities, virtual museum tours, discussion, and research, students develop the ability to explain the significance of artworks in Western and non-Western cultures; identify the medium and technique used to create works of art; and analyze formal elements, principles of design, and stylistic characteristics found in artworks from various art historical periods.

Career Planning* Students use an informative interactive process to explore career and life options in this one-semester elective. They begin with a thorough examination of their own interests, aptitudes, achievements, and personality styles. Instructional material then helps them match job market information, interview techniques, training requirements, and educational paths to potential careers that suit their strengths and personal priorities. Successfully completing this course gives students the ability to identify and describe their personal interests, aptitudes, and lifestyle goals; locate and evaluate information about different careers; identify the skills and knowledge needed for careers of interest and how to obtain them; and create an entrepreneurial business plan.

Driver’s Education* Driver’s Education can provide a foundation for a lifetime of responsible driving. Instructional material in this course emphasizes the mechanics of driving operations and the rules of safe driving. Among other topics, students learn how to assess and manage risk, handle social pressures, understand signs and signals, comprehend the rules of the road, and start, steer, stop, turn, and park a car. They also learn how to contend with driving environments including light and weather conditions, share the roadway, respond to an emergency, buy and maintain a car, plan a trip, take a state driving test, and partner with their parents or guardians to promote safety on the road. Students use a textbook for this onesemester course. Health* This high school course helps students develop the knowledge and skills they need to make healthy decisions that allow them to stay active, safe, and informed. Students learn about the components of a healthy lifestyle and learn strategies for making healthy choices. Instructional material introduces students to the concepts of mental health, emotional health, social health, consumer health, and physical health. It presents opportunities for students to apply their value systems to decisions concerning their own health. Students develop communication skills in this one-semester course that allow them to demonstrate healthy choices with respect for self, family, and others.

Life Skills* This one-semester elective is designed to increase students’ knowledge of and ability in using the skills necessary for everyday living. Life Skills emphasizes defining personal values, goal-setting and planning, and solving problems. Instructional material focuses on dealing with media and peer pressure, communication and relationships, working with others, avoiding and/or resolving conflict, decision making, wellness and personal safety, aspects of good citizenship, environmental awareness, and how students can contribute to their own community. The course is organized in six units, which cover the following topics: course introduction, thinking about yourself, thinking for yourself, taking care of yourself, caring for your relationships, and caring about your world.

Music Appreciation* Students receive an introduction to the elements, instrumentation, and history of music in this onesemester course. Instructional materials emphasize the significance of surroundings and time periods and how they influenced the music of the day. Students listen to and evaluate several types of music and are assessed on their comprehension through projects, presentations, and exams. After completing the course, students have the skills to identify basic musical elements, compare and contrast elements in difference musical genres, identify key musical time periods and their characteristics, identify significant composers and musicians from different time periods, describe different instrumentations in music, and develop critiques of musical pieces based on information in the course.

Nutrition and Wellness* This one-semester elective course provides students with an overview of good nutrition principles that are necessary for physical and mental wellness and a long, healthy life. Instructional materials include discussions of digestion, basic nutrients, weight management, sports and fitness, and life-span nutrition. The Nutrition and Wellness course emphasizes an understanding of today’s food and eating trends and gives students the capacity to intelligently evaluate all available sources of nutrition information and make informed decisions. Unit topics include a course introduction, wellness and food choices in today’s world, digestion and major nutrients, and body size and weight management.

Personal Finance* Understanding financial management concepts is an important life skill that forms the crux of the onesemester Personal Finance course. Students learn to understand the consequences of their financial choices, from credit and debt to insurance, taxes, investments, and discretionary spending. Instructional material surveys typical personal financial needs and emphasizes the basics of budgeting. Through activities and projects with practical applications, students taking this course learn to better prepare for and secure their financial futures. Unit topics in this elective course include money management (personal financial planning and checking), financial security (savings, investments, and risks), credit management, risk management, and taxes and employment forms.

Physical Education This high school course focuses on the fundamental components and principles of fitness. Physical Education examines safety guidelines, proper technique, and exercise principles such as FITT: Frequency (how often you exercise), Intensity (how hard you work during exercise), Time (how long you exercise), and Type (what type of activity you do). Students assess their current level of fitness in relation to the five components of physical fitness: flexibility, cardiovascular health, muscular strength, muscular endurance, and body composition. This two-semester course equips students with strategies to help them begin, design, and maintain an exercise program to keep them fit for life.

Psychology* In this course, students investigate why human beings think and act the way they do. This is an introductory course that broadly covers several areas of psychology. Instructional material presents theories and current research for students to critically evaluate and understand. Each unit introduces terminology, theories, and research that are critical to the understanding of psychology and includes tutorials and interactive exercises. Students learn how to define and use key terms of psychology and how to apply psychological principles to their own lives. Unit topics in this one-semester course include methods of study, biological basis for behavior, learning and memory, development and individual differences, and psychological disorders.

Sociology Through this two-semester course, students explore human relationships in society. Instructional materials emphasize culture, social structure, the individual in society, institutions, and social inequality. Unit topics for the first semester include society and culture, what is sociology, the nature of culture, conformity and deviance, social structure, roles, relationships and groups, and social stratification. In the second semester, students learn about social institutions, the family, religion and education, government and economic systems, the individual in society, the early years, adolescence, the adult years, continuity and change, communities and change, social movements and collective behavior, social problems, minorities and discrimination, poverty, crime, and problems of mass society. Students use a textbook for the course.

Foundations

Algebra I In this two-semester course, students work with and evaluate mathematical expressions, equations, and graphs. Topics include real numbers, simplifying real number expressions with and without variables, solving linear equations and inequalities, solving quadratic equations, graphing linear and quadratic equations, polynomials, factoring, linear patterns, linear systems of equality and inequality, simple matrices, sequences, and radicals. Students learn to work effectively with ratios and direct and inverse variation, understand basic statistics, and solve systems of linear equations and inequalities. Assessments consist of multiple-choice, short-answer, and extended response questions that measure students’ progress. The course also includes self-check quizzes, audio tutorials, and interactive games.

American History Students gain a basic understanding of American history in this two-semester course. Instructional content focuses on the origins of the nation’s democratic principles and continues through present-day domestic and foreign issues that affect American society. Students use critical thinking and problemsolving skills as they complete a variety of assignments. They become well versed in the origins of the United States. By the end of the course, they can identify and analyze key events, documents, and individuals in America’s development as well as issues that still affect the nation both home and abroad. They can also discuss the characteristics that define the United States as a world power.

Biology Biology is a two-semester course that introduces students to general biology principles and the processes of scientific inquiry and thinking. Instructional material covers the fundamentals of living organisms, including physical and chemical properties of life, cellular organization and function, the transfer of energy through metabolic systems, cellular reproduction, the classification of living things, and the six kingdoms of life. The course focuses on presenting biological information on up-to-date principles and concepts in an understandable and straightforward way that helps capture students’ interest. Unit topics include biological principles, chemical and molecular basis of life, cells, genetics, evolution, microorganisms, plants, animals, and human biology and populations.

Earth Science This introductory course incorporates knowledge and facts accumulated from people’s observations of the earth around them and the skies above them. Earth science includes several different branches of study: geology, hydrology, oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy. Students become familiar with the properties of rocks and minerals and their significance as resources. They discuss the theory of plate tectonics and its impact on the continents, and they learn to analyze maps to describe geologic features and meteorological data. Completing this course gives students the knowledge and skills to describe and demonstrate the nature of earth science and design investigations to research and explain the unique features of our planet.

English I In this introductory language arts course, students concentrate on multiple types of mass media as they sharpen their reading and writing skills. The course begins with a diagnostic writing assignment and a reading pre-assessment to help students indentify their strengths and discover what they need to work on. Course content includes literary elements; students study poetry, short stories, and a novel. They participate in online threaded discussions and receive detailed instruction on the writing process, including note taking, generating a thesis, and writing a research paper. Throughout the course, selfcheck interactive activities let students check their understanding before they take quizzes and tests.

English II In this course, students develop critical reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills while they explore classic and modern world literature. They begin by taking a diagnostic writing assignment and a reading pre-assessment to help them identify their strengths and find out what they need to work on. The course covers literary elements, the writing process, understanding and using media, and best practices for giving an oral presentation. It also provides instruction on vocabulary and grammar with a focus on the often-confusing aspects of English usage. Each unit includes a checklist to help students manage their time and keep track of their assignments.

English III Students study American literature and continue to develop their reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills in this intermediate-level course. The lessons feature in-depth tutorials with avatars to help students understand the practical aspects of communicating messages effectively in both academic and work-related scenarios. Assignments include creating oral presentations and conducting an independent project. As they complete these assignments, students synthesize information from the course and create products that will prepare them for upcoming courses in high school and college as well as future careers. Interactive games and questions help reinforce new material for students before they take tests on the content. Study guides and rubrics throughout the house help students be proactive learners.

English IV This course, which is a shortened version of the standard English IV course, can be used in contexts in which instructional time and teacher time may be limited. In English IV Foundations, students read and analyze classic, modern, and contemporary works of literature. They explore several genres, including plays, short stories, poetry, essays, and novels. The course includes a variety of learning activities; students do a lot of close reading, learn how to paraphrase material, and participate in online, threaded discussions. Assignments are diverse, too: students complete essays and research papers, maintain reflective journals, and create oral presentations. They learn about the validity of sources and hone their writing skills as they complete their projects.

Geography Geography examines a broad range of geographical perspectives covering the major regions of the world. Each region is reviewed in a similar structure so students can clearly see the similarities and differences between each one. The course continues with a look at the regions from cultural, economic, and political perspectives, closely examining the human impact on each region. Students explore each region’s location globally and its physical characteristics, including absolute and relative location, climate, and significant geographical features. Unit topics include an introduction to geography, North America, Central America, South America, Western Europe, Eastern Europe and Russia, and East Asia.

Geometry In this two-semester course, students bone up on geometric terms and processes, explore logic, and develop problem-solving skills. The course includes topics such as parallel lines and planes, congruent triangles, inequalities, quadrilaterals, and various forms of proofs. Students hone their reasoning, and problem-solving skills as they study similarity, areas, volume, circles, and coordinate geometry. At the end of the course, they have the ability to identify and apply the properties of rays, angles, triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, circles, and parallel and perpendicular lines. They can also write conditional statements and proofs, graph linear functions, prove that certain figures are congruent or similar, and apply transformations to various figures.

Health* This one-semester course presents a range of topics and instructional material that is designed to help students develop strategies for making healthy choices, staying safe, being active, and remaining informed about health issues. Among other topics, students explore factors of psychological health, aspects of social and consumer health, details about nutrition, types of infectious and noninfectious diseases and the prevention of disease, first aid and CPR, human sexuality, and drug and alcohol awareness. They learn about the components of a healthy lifestyle and learn decision making and communication skills to help them protect their health and demonstrate respect for family members and others in their lives.

Physical Science Physical Science serves as an introductory course that prepares students for high school Biology, Chemistry, and Physics courses. In this course, students learn about the nature of science, including scientific processes, the scientific method, and scientific inquiry. The course covers safety in the lab and the field, principles for conducting experiments, and the need for scientific communication. Instructional content includes the atomic nature of matter, classification of the elements, the periodic table, acids, and bases. Students explore the various forms of energy and energy transformations and discuss the production of electricity. The course concludes with a unit on the composition and structure of the universe, the life cycles of stars, and space exploration.

World History This two-semester core course explores world history from prehistoric to contemporary times. Students learn about the socioeconomic, political, and ideological conditions of various time periods. They use primary and secondary sources, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills to study historical events and cultural achievements of world regions and to complete assignments that help them establish real-world connections to the course content. They learn to interpret statistical data from maps, charts, and graphs. They summarize the achievements of civilizations, particularly in the fields of science, technology, and the arts. Instructional content encourages students to articulate the relationship between historical and current events and predict how contemporary issues will affect future generations.

* = .5 credit course
**Aventa Learning by K12 has been authorized to use the AP designation, following successful review of its courses by the College Board. AP and Advanced Placement Program are registered trademarks of the College Board.




 
 



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