ADLA Course Catalog

Detailed course descriptions are below the list of course titles. Click the appropriate for Test Preperation Course Catalog and Remediation Course Catalog.

Advanced Placement**
AP® Biology

AP® Calculus

AP® Chemistry
AP® English Lit & Comp

AP® US History
 
English Language Arts
English 6

English 7

English 8

English 9
English 10

English 11

English 12

Structure of Writing*
 
Math
Integrated Math

Algebra 1

Algebra 2

Consumer Mathematics*

Geometry
Math 6

Math 7

Pre-Algebra

Precalculus

Probability and Statistics*
 
Science
Biology

Chemistry

Earth and Space Science

Integrated Physics/Chemistry
Life Science

Physical Science

Physics
 
Social Studies
African American Studies*

American Government

American History 1

American History 2

Civics

Economics

Geography

MS US History
MS World History*

Native American Studies:
Contemporary Perspectives*

Native American Studies:
Historical Perspectives*

World History Before 1815*

World History Since 1500

World History Since 1815*
 
World Languages
Chinese I

Chinese II

French I

French II

French III

German I

German II
Latin I

Latin II

Spanish I

Spanish II

Spanish III

AP® French

AP® Spanish
 
Electives
Art History and Appreciation*

Computer Applications and Technology*

World Religions: Exploring Diversity*

American Literature*

Anthropology I:
Uncovering Human Mysteries*

Anthropology II:
More Human Mysteries Uncovered*

Archeology: Detectives of the Past*

British Literature*

Career Explorations*

Criminology: Inside the Criminal Mind*

Digital Photography I:
Creating Images with Impact!*

Digital Photography II:
Discovering Your Creative Potential*

Forensic Science I: Secrets of the Dead*

Forensic Science II:
More Secrets of the Dead*

Gothic Literature: Monster Stories*

Great Minds in Science:
Ideas for a New Generation*
Health*

International Business:
Global Commerce in the 21st Century*

Introduction to Philosophy:
The Big Picture*

Law & Order:
Introduction to Legal Studies*

Music Appreciation:
The Enjoyment of Listening*

Personal & Family Finance*

Personal Finance*

Personal Psychology I:
The Road to Self-Discovery*

Personal Psychology II:
Living in a Complex World*

Physical Education*

Real World Parenting*

Social Issues* - coming soon

Sociology I: The Study of Human Relationships*

Sociology II: Your Social Life*

Veterinary Science: The Care of Animals*

World Literature*
 

* 1/2 credit course
** AP® is a trademark registered and/or owned by the College Board, which was not involved with the production of, and does not endorse, this product.

Course Descriptions

A comprehensive 4x4 offering of engaging and award-winning courses, aligned to state and national standards and based on leading research and proven best practices.

Math Courses

Integrated Math
This course provides an introduction to Algebra I and Geometry. It covers linear equations, graphing lines, quadratic equations, function notation, rational expressions, and equations. Additional topics include lines and planes, rays and angles, two-column proofs, congruent triangles, trigonometric relations, polygons and circles, geometric solids, coordinate geometry, graphing equations, and data analysis.

Algebra 1
A comprehensive study of all of the concepts of Algebra I required to meet state and Common Core standards. With multiple opportunities for practice and review, students easily master skills including variables, linear equations, quadratic equations, function notation, and exponential functions.

Algebra 2
Algebra 2 expands on the algebraic functions learned in Algebra I by bringing in concepts of linear, quadratic, and simultaneous equations; laws of exponents; progression; binomial theorems; and logarithms. The course units are competency-based. Learners experience new situations which they practice in a real-world environment and match to previous learning.

Consumer Mathematics
This course explains how four basic mathematical operations – addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division – can be used to solve real-life problems. It addresses practical applications for math, such as wages, taxes, money management, and interest and credit. Projects for the Real World activities are included that promote cross-curricular learning and higher-order thinking and problem-solving skills.

Geometry
The course is designed to enable students to develop a deep understanding of geometry objectives through lessons, tutorials, activities, online discussions, and learning aids. It is based on the Common Core State Standards Initiative and on a modern understanding of student learning in mathematics and STEM disciplines. Most lesson activities throughout the course employ a
dynamic geometry tool, GeoGebra, helping learners to explore properties of geometric shapes and to test conjectures. GeoGebra allows learners to construct and modify geometric figures, take measurements, and describe geometric shapes algebraically, and tutorials provide direct instruction and interactive checks of understanding.

Math 6
Math 6 explores basic math concepts and their real-world applications. Students increase their skills with decimals, fractions, percentages, and ratios. The course provides tools for problem solving and includes an introduction to algebra and geometry. Among the topics studied are discrete math and probability, surface area, equations, statistics, and data analysis.

Math 7
Math 7 builds on material learned in earlier grades, including fractions, decimals, and percentages and introduces students to concepts they will continue to use throughout their study of mathematics. Among these are surface area, volume, and probability. Real-world applications facilitate understanding, and students are provided multiple opportunities to master these skills through practice problems within lessons, homework drills, and graded assignments.

Pre-Algebra
This course sharpens students’ arithmetic skills and illustrates abstract concepts by introducing linear equations, number patterns, the order of operations, linear inequalities, fractions, exponents, and factoring. Some basic components of geometry are discussed.

Precalculus
Precalculus builds on algebraic concepts to prepare students for calculus. The course begins with a review of basic algebraic concepts and moves into operations with functions, where students manipulate functions and their graphs. Precalculus also provides a detailed look at trigonometric functions, their graphs, the trigonometric identities, and the unit circle. Finally, students are introduced to polar coordinates, parametric equations, and limits.

Probability and Statistics
This course is designed for students in grades 11 and 12 who may not have attained a deep and integrated understanding of the topics in earlier grades. Students acquire a comprehensive understanding of how to represent and interpret data; how to relate data sets; independent and conditional probability; applying probability; making relevant inferences and conclusions; and how to use probability to make decisions.


English Language Arts Courses

English 6
This course provides a strong foundation in grammar and the writing process. It emphasizes simple but useful composition and language mechanics strategies with multiple opportunities for modeling practical, real-world writing situations that will enable students to improve their written communication skills quickly. Through a variety of grade-appropriate reading selections, students develop a clear understanding of key literary genres and their distinguishing characteristics.

English 7
Integrates the study of writing and literature through the examination of a variety of genres. Students identify the elements of composition in the reading selections to understand their function and effect on the reader. Practice is provided in narrative and expository writing. Topics include comparison and contrast, persuasion, and cause and effect essays, as well as descriptive and figurative language. Lessons are supplemented with vocabulary development, grammar, and syntax exercises, along with an introduction to verbal phrases and research tools.

English 8
Extends the skills developed in English 7 through detailed study of parts of sentences and paragraphs to understand their importance to good writing. Students also acquire study skills such as time management and improved test-taking strategies. Other topics include punctuation, word choice, syntax, varying of sentence structure, subordination and coordination, detail and elaboration, effective use of reference materials, and proofreading.

English 9
English 9 introduces the elements of writing poems, short stories, plays, and essays. Grammar skills are enhanced by the study of sentence structure and style and by student composition of paragraphs and short essays. Topics include narration, exposition, description, argumentation, punctuation, usage, spelling, and sentence and paragraph structure.

English 10
This course focuses on using personal experiences, opinions, and interests as a foundation for developing effective writing skills. Skills acquired in English I are reinforced and refined. Literary models demonstrate paragraph unity and more sophisticated word choice. A research paper is required for completion of course. Topics include grammar, sentence and paragraph structure, organizing compositions, and the research paper.

English 11
Each unit in English 11 uses a central theme to teach reading, writing, grammar, and mechanics, providing learners with a cohesive and connected learning experience. Units provide a comprehensive overview of American literature from pre-1800 forward, including early American literature, depression-era literature, and contemporary literature. Assigned readings include
American masters, and course discussions provide an opportunity for discourse on specific course concepts and their applications. In this way, the course encourages the development of critical twenty-first-century skills.

English 12
English 12 builds on the reading, writing, grammar, and mechanics concepts developed in English 11. Each unit allows students to learn both reading concepts and writing skills. By reading and analyzing a variety of literature, students learn about elements of fiction, such as theme, plot, and setting. They examine figurative language in poetry and drama and continue to focus on important writing skills, such as sentence and paragraph structure, sequencing, and proofreading. English 12 spans literary history from the Anglo-Saxons and the medieval period through the Victorian age and contemporary literature.

Structure of Writing
This semester-long course focuses on building good sentences. Students will learn how to put words, phrases, and clauses together and how to punctuate correctly. They will start using sentences in short compositions. As an extra bonus, students will add some new words to their vocabulary, and they will practice spelling difficult words. Near the end of the course, students are to submit a book report. Early in the course, encourage students to start looking for the books they want to read for the book report. They might also preview the introduction to that lesson so they know what will be expected.


Science Courses

Biology
Students develop a clear understanding of the sometimes complex concepts at the root of life science. Course units cover genetics and evolution, cell structure, multiple units on the diversity of life and on plant structure and function. For example, the unit on cell structure and specialization drills down into mitosis, meiosis, and cancer and carcinogens.

Chemistry
The course surveys chemical theory, descriptive chemistry, and changes in matter and its properties. Students learn how to classify different states of matter as well as how atoms and compounds are structured. Additional areas of discussion include chemical energetics, measurements, bonding, stoichiometry, ionization, hydrocarbons, oxidation and reduction. A variety of simple lab experiments are included.

Earth and Space Science
This course surveys basic physical sciences such as geology, biology, meteorology, oceanography, astronomy, botany, and physics and their impact on the earth. Students are guided to a better understanding of how the earth and the universe are structured.

Integrated Physics & Chemistry
The lessons in this course employ direct-instruction approaches. They include application and inquiry-oriented activities that facilitate the development of higher-order cognitive skills, such as
logical reasoning, sense-making, and problem solving.

Life Science
Each unit in Life Science uses a central theme to teach a Life Science concept, thus providing learners with a cohesive and connected learning experience. The course begins with an overview of scientific inquiry, and subsequent units explore the cellular and chemical bases of life, classification and diversity of life, and genetics.

Physical Science
Beginning with the first unit, Properties and Structures of Matter, Physical Science is a comprehensive exploration of the physical world. The course studies inanimate matter as well as topics in astronomy and geology, and broadens the student’s understanding of the states of matter by applying them to weather and atmosphere. Other units include; Forces and Motion;
Energy and its Application; and Chemistry Fundamentals.

Physics
Physics introduces students to the physics of motion, properties of matter, force, heat, vector, light, and sound. Students learn the history of physics from the discoveries of Galileo and Newton to those of contemporary physicists. The course focuses more on explanation than calculation and prepares students for introductory quantitative physics at the college level. Additional areas of discussion include gases and liquids, atoms, electricity, magnetism, and nuclear physics.

Social Studies Courses
African American Studies
This semester-long course traces the experiences of Africans in the Americas from 1500 to the present day. In this course, students will explore history, politics, and culture. Although the course proceeds in chronological order, lessons are also grouped by themes and trends in African American history. Therefore, some time periods and important people are featured in more than
one lesson.

American Government
American Government is a comprehensive survey of the operation and development of federal, state, county, and city governments. The course examines all aspects of government: its statute making, diplomacy, labor policies, public finance, and the contrasts between national, state, and local levels of government. Areas of discussion include the Constitution; civil rights and equality; the legislative, judicial and executive branches; the Federal Reserve System, and foreign policy.

American History 1
Examines the founding and development of the United States from the start of European exploration and settling of the original colonies to how it grew and became a powerful united nation. Topics covered include the pre-colonial cultures of Indigenous peoples, the arrival and impact of Europeans in North America, the Revolutionary War, Manifest Destiny, the Civil War, the Industrial Revolution, the United States in the 20th Century, and the influence of immigration on American society and culture.

American History 2
Building on American History 1, this course develops an understanding of American culture, historical events, and life, learners develop skills to identify, analyze, and evaluate information presented in a variety of formats, including Internet-based research. In addition, learners develop the ability to evaluate and discuss (both orally and in writing) the impact of various events, issues, persons, and trends on American culture, historical events, and life.

Civics
Interactive, problem-centered, and inquiry-based, each unit in Civics emphasizes the acquisition, mastery, and processing of information. Every unit features both factual and conceptual study
questions. Instructional strategies include Socratic instruction, student-centered learning, and experiential learning. Topics covered range from Basic Concepts of Power and Authority and National Institutions of Government to analyses of society and citizenship.

Economics
This courses leverages diverse resources from the National Council on Economic Education in partnership with the National Association of Economic Educators, and the Foundation for Teaching Economics. It begins with providing a basic understanding of the U.S. economy and its relationship to the world economy. It then covers macro issues such as government and the economy and micro issues such as entrepreneurship and consumer issues.

Middle School US History
This semester of Middle School US History covers the people who lived in the Americas before European settlers arrived, how the United States was founded, and how it grew and changed over time. The students may be familiar with some of the topics that appear in these lessons, but others will be new. Students should read all the content and think about it carefully as they work through the course.

Middle School World History
This is an engaging, course offering students an in-depth but easily understood view of the human experience, from the earliest civilizations through the Age of Enlightenment. Interactive features allow students to apply their mastery of lessons through such activities as customizing maps and designing feudal villages. An audio pronunciation guide assists students' ability to say and remember the names of people and places. Frequent self-check practice questions and homework assignments prepare students for the accompanying assignments.

Native American Studies: Contemporary Perspectives

This course complements Native American Studies: Historical Perspectives. It explores Native American worldviews, art, media perspectives on Native Americans, and contemporary perspectives and organizations. It concludes by providing a global perspective by examining issues face by indigenous peoples throughout the world.

Native American Studies: Historical Perspectives
By providing historical perspectives, this course provides a comprehensive understanding of the roots of Native American culture. The topics addressed include an exploration of the Native American history in the arctic and subarctic, various regions of the U.S., and the development of Native American life as it became increasingly affected by European-American legal, cultural, and demographic influences.

World Geography
The course is designed to enable students to develop a deep understanding of world geography objectives through tutorials, lesson activities, online discussions, unit activities, and learning aids. The course begins at a conceptual level, presenting facts, skills, and ideas that students will apply when thinking about real-world issues. It then focuses on specific regions of the world, with each lesson highlighting an area of the world that shares geographic commonalities in terms of location or culture. These regional units discuss the similarities and differences among regions and the reasons for each. The engaging content includes vibrant images and informational videos that connect students to global cultures and the physical world.

World History Since 1500
This course follows human history from the Renaissance and the end of the Middle Ages until the present day. Topics covered include the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, Industrial Revolution, the African and Asian colonial experience, the rise of European Nationalism, and the horrors of World War I. In the second half students learn about the rise of totalitarian ideologies of Fascism and Communism, World War II, the Cold War, Post-Colonial Africa, the Rise of Asian Economies, and the Global War on Terror.

World History Before 1815
In this course, students study human events from the first use of agriculture 15,000 years ago through the end of the French Revolution in 1815. Included are lessons on the ancient civilizations of Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Later lessons examine the great periods of global exploration and expansion, as well as scientific discovery. Also studied are the revolutions in England, America, and France.

World History Since 1815

This course follows human history from the end of the French Revolution until the present day. Topics covered include the Industrial Revolution, the African and Asian colonial experience, the rise of European Nationalism, and the horrors of World War I. In the second half students read about the rise of totalitarian ideologies of Fascism and Communism, World War II, the Cold War, Post-Colonial Africa, the Rise of Asian Economies, and the Global War on Terror.


Advanced Placement Courses

Challenge your accelerated students and help them achieve even more with ten semesters of courses that address 100% of the standards defined by the College Board.

AP®** Biology
To generate skills for lifelong learning, 25 percent of the lessons in AP Biology use student-driven, constructivist approaches for concept development. The remaining lessons employ directinstruction AP approaches. In both cases, the lessons incorporate multimedia-rich, interactive resources to make learning an engaging experience. The AP approach to advanced biology topics helps students achieve mastery of abstract concepts and their application in everyday life and in STEM-related professions.

AP®** Calculus
This course grounds the study of calculus in real-world scenarios and integrates it with the four STEM disciplines. The first semester covers functions, limits, derivatives, and the application of derivatives. The course goes on to cover differentiation and antidifferentiation, applications of integration, inverse functions, and techniques of integration.

AP®** Chemistry
AP Chemistry includes most of the 22 laboratory experiments recommended by the College Board to provide a complete AP experience in a blended environment. More than 25 percent of the online lesson modules are inquiry-based and employ online simulations, data-based analysis, online data-based tools, and ―kitchen sink labs that require no specialized equipment or supervision. Many of the lessons include significant practice in stoichiometry and other critical, advanced chemistry skills.

AP®** English Lit & Comp
Each unit of Advanced English Literature and Composition is based on a researched scope and sequence that covers the essential concepts of literature at an AP level. Students engage in indepth analysis of literary works in order to provide both depth and breadth of coverage of the readings. Units include Close Analysis and Interpretation of Fiction, Short Fiction, the Novel, and Poetic Form and Content. Writing activities reinforce the reading activities and include writing arguments, analysis, interpretation, evaluation, and college application essays.

AP®** US History
This course develops critical thinking skills by encouraging multiple views as students realized that there are often multiple accounts of a single historical event that may not be entirely consistent. Electronic discussion groups encourage collaboration, and a variety of practice activities are provided, from multiple choice actions to advanced interactions. Units include: The Historical Process; Early America; Revolutionary America; The Civil War; Populism and Progressivism; the emergence of the U.S. as a world power; and contemporary themes.


Global Languages

American Distance Learning Academy has partnered with Middlebury Interactive Languages to provide a robust, comprehensive, and effective online language curriculum. The courses meet the standards established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. The 26 semesters of highly interactive, graphically rich and visually stimulating language curriculum prepares your students for success in the global community of the 21st century.

Chinese I
Students begin their introduction to Chinese with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. As students begin the course, they construct their own Avatar that accumulates “Avatar bucks”—by performing well on course tasks—to use to purchase materials (clothing, gadgets, scenery, etc.) at the “Avatar store.” Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Chinese-speaking countries. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Chinese II
Students continue their introduction to Chinese with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. As students begin the course, they construct their own Avatar that accumulates “Avatar bucks”—by performing well on course tasks—to use to purchase materials (clothing, gadgets, scenery, etc.) at the “Avatar store.” Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Chinese-speaking countries. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

French I
Students begin their introduction to French with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. As students begin the course, they construct their own Avatar that accumulates “Avatar bucks”—by performing well on course tasks—to use to purchase materials (clothing, gadgets, scenery, etc.) at the “Avatar store.” Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe and across the globe. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

French II
Students continue their introduction to French with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. As students begin the course, they construct their own Avatar that accumulates “Avatar bucks”—by performing well on course tasks—to use to purchase materials (clothing, gadgets,
scenery, etc.) at the “Avatar store.” Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas across the globe, and assessments. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

French III
In this expanding engagement with French, students deepen their focus on four key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. In addition, students read significant works of literature in French, and respond orally or in writing to these works. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. As students begin the course, they construct their own Avatar that accumulates “Avatar bucks”—by performing well on course tasks—to use to purchase materials (clothing, gadgets, scenery, etc.) at the “Avatar store.” Continuing the pattern, and building on what students encountered in the first two years, each week consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

German I
Students begin their introduction to German with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. As students begin the course, they construct their own Avatar that accumulates “Avatar bucks”—by performing well on course tasks—to use to purchase materials (clothing, gadgets, scenery, etc.) at the “Avatar store.” Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major German-speaking areas in Europe. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

German II
Students continue their introduction to German with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. As students begin the course, they construct their own Avatar that accumulates “Avatar bucks”—by performing well on course tasks—to use to purchase materials (clothing, gadgets, scenery, etc.) at the “Avatar store.” Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major German-speaking areas in Europe. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Latin I
Students begin their introduction to Latin with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. As students begin the course, they construct their own Avatar that accumulates “Avatar bucks”—by performing well on course tasks—to use to purchase materials (clothing, gadgets,
scenery, etc.) at the “Avatar store.” Each week consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and cultural presentations covering significant aspects of Roman culture or their modern-day manifestations, and assessments. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Latin II
Students continue their introduction to Latin with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. As students begin the course, they construct their own Avatar that accumulates “Avatar bucks”—by performing well on course tasks—to use to purchase materials (clothing, gadgets,
scenery, etc.) at the “Avatar store.” Each week consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, a notable ancient myth in Latin, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and cultural presentations covering significant aspects of Roman culture or their modern-day manifestations, and assessments. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Spanish I
Students begin their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. As students begin the course, they construct their own Avatar that accumulates “Avatar bucks”—by performing well on course tasks—to use to purchase materials (clothing, gadgets,
scenery, etc.) at the “Avatar store.” Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Spanish II
Students continue their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. The course exemplifies a marriage of the best in language learning pedagogy and online learning. As students begin the course, they construct their own Avatar that accumulates “Avatar bucks”—by performing well on course tasks—to use to purchase materials (clothing, gadgets, scenery, etc.) at the “Avatar store.” Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas, and assessments. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Spanish III
In this expanding engagement with Spanish, students deepen their focus on four key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. In addition, students read significant works of literature in Spanish, and respond orally or in writing to these works. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. As students begin the course, they construct their Avatar that accumulates “Avatar bucks”—by performing well on course tasks—to use to purchase materials (clothing, gadgets, scenery, etc.) at the “Avatar store.” Continuing the pattern, and building on what students encountered in the first two years, each week consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

AP®** French
The majority of the course is conducted almost entirely in French. The tips and grammar tutorials are a mix of French and English to aid in the student’s comprehension of the material since this is an online course. The course is divided into eight units. Each semester includes four content units. The last unit of the second semester is a review specifically for the AP Exam. Each unit is based on an overall theme and highlights a specific country or region of the French world. Each unit is divided into three lessons and a unit wrap-up. Each lesson contains approximately twelve to fifteen activities. Although this course is completely online, you will have a teacher who will be available to answer any questions you might have regarding the course and the content. The teacher will also be correcting your assignments and any audio or essay submissions.

AP®** Spanish
The majority of the course is conducted almost entirely in Spanish. The tips and grammar tutorials are a mix of Spanish and English to aid in the student’s comprehension of the material since this is an online course. The course is divided into ten units. Each semester includes four content units and one semester review and test. The last unit of the second semester is a review specifically for the AP Exam. Each unit is based on an overall theme, and highlights a specific country or region of the Hispanic world. Each unit is divided into three lessons and a unit wrap-up. Each lesson contains approximately ten to twelve activities. Although this course is completely online, you will have a teacher who will be available to answer any questions you might have regarding the course and the content. The teacher will also be correcting your assignments and any audio or essay submissions.


Elective Courses

Our offering of over 30 diverse and interactive elective courses to keep students motivated and engaged in the learning process. Empowering students to pursue their passions helps each one of them to achieve their potential.

Art History and Appreciation
This course explores the main concepts of art, expression, and creativity as it helps students answer questions such as what is art; what is creativity; and how and why people respond to art. It covers essential design principles such as emphasis, balance, and unity. Units include: Art, History, and Culture; Western and World Art Appreciation; and Art and the Modern World.

Computer Applications and Technology
Throughout this course students are presented with a variety of computer applications and technology concepts and demonstrate their understanding of those concepts through practical problem-solving exercises. A course project includes activities related to the course objectives and can be assigned for work throughout the course.

American Literature
This course surveys American authors and the historical development of literature in America. The course illustrates how the events in history and the cultural heritage of the times influenced the work of authors. The ability to analyze literary works is stressed. Topics include Puritanism, Deism, Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Transcendentalism, Realism, and Naturalism.

Anthropology I: Uncovering Human Mysteries
Anthropology uses a broad approach to give students an understanding of our past, present, and future, and also addresses the problems humans face in biological, social, and cultural life. This course explores the evolution, similarity, and diversity of humankind through time. It looks at how we have evolved from a biologically and culturally weak species to one that has the ability to cause catastrophic change. Exciting online video journeys are just one of the powerful learning tools utilized in this course.

Anthropology II: More Human Mysteries Uncovered
This course continues the study of global cultures and the ways that humans have made sense of their world. It examines ways that cultures have understood and given meaning to different stages of life and death. The course also examines the creation of art within cultures and how cultures evolve and change over time. Finally, students apply the concepts and insights learned from the study of anthropology to several cultures found in the world today.

Archeology: Detectives of the Past*
The field of archeology helps us better understand the events and societies of the past that have helped to shape the modern world. This course focuses on the techniques, methods, and theories that guide the study of the past. Students learn how archaeological research is conducted and interpreted, as well as how artifacts are located and preserved. Finally, students learn about the relationship of material items to culture and what we can learn about past societies from these items.

British Literature*
This course provides a comprehensive look at the evolution of British literature from the AngloSaxon period through the Modern Age. The course emphasizes the cultural and historical elements that shape literary movements. Twenty-six of the thirty-four lessons focus on literary analysis, while writing lessons focus on real-world applications, analytical essays, and research papers. Language lessons focus on usage, mechanics, and critical thinking. Of course all course readings and literary texts are provided online.

Career Explorations*
Throughout this course, students will practice valuable life and career skills, including resume writing, interview techniques, budgeting, time management, and long-term planning. This course also encourages learners to use a number of employment resources both in print and on the Internet. Practical topics are engagingly presented and include search skills, industry clusters, entrepreneurship, and effective resume preparation and interviewing skills.

Criminology: Inside the Criminal Mind*
Crime and deviant behavior rank at or near the top of many people’s concerns. This course looks at possible explanations for crime from the standpoint of psychological, biological, and sociological perspectives, explore the categories and social consequences of crime, and investigate how the criminal justice system handles not only criminals, but also their crimes. Why do some individuals commit crimes and others do not? What aspects in our culture and society promote crime and deviance? Why are different punishments given for the same crime? What factors shape the criminal case process?

Digital Photography I: Creating Images with Impact
Digital Photography I focuses on the basics of photography, including building an understanding of aperture, shutter speed, lighting, and composition. Students will be introduced to the history of photography and basic camera functions. Students use basic techniques of composition and camera functions to build a personal portfolio of images, capturing people, landscapes, closeups, and action photographs.

Digital Photography II: Discovering Your Creative Potential
In this course, we examine various aspects of professional photography, including the ethics of the profession, and examine some of the areas in which professional photographers may choose to specialize, such as wedding photography and product photography. Students also learn about some of the most respected professional photographers in history and how to critique photographs in order to better understand what creates an eye-catching photograph.

Forensic Science I: Secrets of the Dead
In this unit, students are introduced to forensic science. We discuss what forensic science consists of and how the field developed through history. Topics covered include some of the responsibilities of forensic scientists and about some of the specialty areas that forensic scientists may work in. Objective and critical thinking questions are combined with lab activities to introduce students to analyzing the crime scene, a wide variety of physical evidence such as firearm and explosion evidence, and DNA evidence.

Forensic Science II: More Secrets of the Dead

Although the crime scene is the first step in solving crimes through forensic science, the crime laboratory plays a critical role in the analysis of evidence. This course focuses on the analysis of evidence and testing that takes place within the lab. It examines some of the basic scientific principles and knowledge that guide forensic laboratory processes, such as those testing DNA, toxicology, and material analysis. Techniques such as microscopy, chromatography, odontology, mineralogy, and spectroscopy will be examined.

Gothic Literature: Monster Stories
From vampires to ghosts, frightening stories have influenced fiction writers since the 18th century. This course focuses on the major themes found in Gothic literature and demonstrates how core writing drivers produce thrilling psychological environments for the reader. Terror versus horror, the influence of the supernatural, and descriptions of the difference between good and evil are just a few of the themes presented. By the time students have completed this course, they will have gained an understanding of and an appreciation for the complex nature of dark fiction.

Great Minds in Science: Ideas for a New Generation

Is there life on other planets? What extremes can the human body endure? Can we solve the problem of global warming? Today, scientists, explorers, and writers are working to answer all of these questions. Like Edison, Einstein, Curie, and Newton, scientists of today are asking questions and working on problems that may revolutionize our lives and world. This course focuses on ten of today’s greatest scientific minds. Each unit takes an in-depth look at one of these individuals, and shows how their ideas may help to shape tomorrow’s world.

Health
This course is based on a rigorously researched scope and sequence that covers the essential concepts of health. Students are provided with a variety of health concepts and demonstrate their understanding of those concepts through problem solving. The five units explore a wide variety of topics that include nutrition and fitness, disease and injury, development and sexuality, substance abuse, and mental and community health.

International Business: Global Commerce in the 21st Century
From geography to culture, Global Business is an exciting topic. This course helps students develop the appreciation, knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to live and work in a global marketplace. Business structures, global entrepreneurship, business management, marketing, and the challenges of managing international organizations are all explored in this course. Students cultivate an awareness of how history, geography, language, cultural studies, research skills, and continuing education are important in business activities and the 21st century.

Introduction to Philosophy: The Big Picture
This course is an exciting adventure that covers more than 2,500 years of history. Despite their sometimes odd behavior, philosophers of the Western world are among the most brilliant and influential thinkers of all time. As students learn about these great thinkers, they’ll come to see how and where many of the most fundamental ideas of Western Civilization originated. They’ll also get a chance to consider some of the same questions these great thinkers pondered.

World Religions: Exploring Diversity
Throughout the ages, religions have shaped the political, social, and cultural aspects of societies. This course focuses on the major religions that have played a role in human history, including Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Shintoism, and Taosim. Students trace major developments in these religions and explore their relationships with social institutions and culture. The course also discusses some of the similarities and differences among the major religions and examines their related connections and differences.

Law & Order: Introduction to Legal Studies
From traffic laws to regulations on how the government operates, laws help provide society with order and structure. Our lives are guided and regulated by our society’s legal expectations. Consumer laws help protect us from faulty goods; criminal laws help to protect society from individuals who harm others; and family law handles the arrangements and issues that arise in areas like divorce and child custody. This course focuses on the creation and application of laws in various areas of society.

Music Appreciation: The Enjoyment of Listening
Music is part of everyday life and reflects the spirit of our human condition. To know and understand music, we distinguish and identify cultures on local and global levels. This course provides students with an aesthetic and historical perspective of music, covering a variety of styles and developments from the Middle Ages through the 21st Century. Students acquire basic knowledge and listening skills, making their future music experiences more informed and enriching.

Personal & Family Finance

How do personal financial habits affect students’ financial futures? How can they make smart decisions with money in the areas of saving, spending, and investing? This course introduces students to basic financial habits such as setting financial goals, budgeting, and creating financial plans. Students learn about topics such as taxation, financial institutions, credit, and money management. The course also addresses how occupations and educational choices can influence personal financial planning, and how individuals can protect themselves from identity theft.

Personal Finance

This course focuses on reviewing and applying arithmetic skills utilized at home and in business. Students learn how to budget, spend, invest, and make every day financial decisions. Topics include budgeting, computing income and property taxes, investing in the stock market, finding interest rates, analyzing statistics, and balancing financial accounts.

Personal Psychology I: The Road to Self-Discovery
Self-knowledge is the key to self-improvement. More than 800,000 high school students take psychology classes each year. Among the different reasons, there is usually the common theme of self-discovery. Sample topics include the study of infancy, childhood, adolescence, perception and states of consciousness. The course features amazing online psychology experiments dealing with our own personal behavior.

Personal Psychology II: Living in a Complex World
This course enriches the quality of students’ lives by teaching them to understand the actions of others. Topics include the study of memory, intelligence, emotion, health, stress and personality. This course features exciting online psychology experiments involving the world around us.

Physical Education
This course’s three units include Getting Active, Improving Performance, and Lifestyle. Unit activities elevate students’ self-awareness of their health and well-being while examining topics such as diet and mental health and exploring websites and other resources. In addition to being effective as a stand-alone course, the components can be easily integrated into other health and wellness courses.

Real World Parenting
What is the best way to care for children and teach them self-confidence and a sense of responsibility? Parenting involves more than having a child and providing food and shelter. Students learn what to prepare for, what to expect, and what vital steps parents can take to create the best environment for their children. Parenting roles and responsibilities, nurturing and protective environments for children, positive parenting strategies, and effective communication in parent/child relationships are other topics covered in this course.

Social Issues
Because the specifics of social issues change rapidly, this course is designed to have students discover contemporary and relevant perspectives on issues that may have been around for centuries. Students engage in significant research and each lesson ends with an essay assignment that encourages students to express their opinions. Topics include media, government, civil liberties, poverty, terrorism, crime, the environment, and many more.

Sociology I: The Study of Human Relationships
The world is becoming more complex. How do beliefs, values and behaviors affect people and the world in which we live? Students examine social problems in our increasingly connected world, and learn how human relationships can strongly influence and impact their lives. Exciting online video journeys are an important component of this relevant and engaging course.

Sociology II: Your Social Life
Sociology is the study of people, social life, and society. By developing a “sociological imagination” students are able to examine how society itself shapes human action and beliefs, and how in turn these factors re-shape society itself. Fascinating online video journeys will not only inform students, but motivate them to seek more knowledge on their own.

Veterinary Science: The Care of Animals
As animals play an increasingly important role in our lives, scientists have sought to learn more about their health and well-being. This course examines some of the common diseases and treatments for domestic animals. Toxins, parasites, and infectious diseases impact not only the animals around us, but at times humans as well. Through veterinary medicine and science, the prevention and treatment of diseases and health issues is studied and applied.

World Literature
World Literature provides students with a survey of some of the world's best and most well-known literature. Lesson notes supplement reading assignments and emphasize common themes found across cultures and historical timelines. Submissions use a combination of objective multiple choice and short answer questions, as well as subjective questions that require students to support their opinions. Finally, two full-length writing assignments ask students to apply their knowledge in essay form.


Footnotes

* 1/2 credit course
** AP® is a trademark registered and/or owned by the College Board, which was not involved with the production of, and does not endorse, this product.




 
 



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